Luxembourg, Belgium, Terrain Shock

Arising early, we broke camp and took a quick bicycle tour of the sites of Trier, Germany. Being a Sunday morning, the traffic was nil and the tourists crowds the same (except the crowd of tourists at the birthplace of Karl Marx who were taking as many pictures of us as the house. (The trailers on Tom and Ginny’s bikes always get people staring).

The coliseum was never completed and was converted into a fortification wall.
The coliseum was never completed and was converted into a fortification wall.
The Treir, Germany birthplace of Karl Marx. His first book was about capitalism.
The Trier, Germany birthplace of Karl Marx. His first book was about capitalism.
A staged photo of Tom cycling by Karl's birthplace after the other tourists clears out.
A staged photo of Tom cycling by Karl’s birthplace after the tourists cleared out and before the next hoards coming down the street reached it.

We crossed back over the Mosel and went to the supermarket which, of course, was closed, so we headed soth on the bike path hoping for an open cafe. We would not find one until 1:00 in the afternoon in Luxembourg.

The wide peaceful Mosel in Trier.
The wide peaceful Mosel in Trier.

We were looking to leave the river and strike west toward Luxembourg city. As soon as we crossed country line we turned away from the river and were reintroduced to hill climbing. I had not really worked up a sweat for several days and in 5 minutes I was drenched. We got to the top of the steep but short climb and were at a dead-end. Someone had mis-signed, or even turned, the bike route sign at the bottom of the hill. We zoomed back down and took the correct route.

There are no border controls between countries that we have seen, Sometimes there is not even a sign.
There are no border controls between countries that we have seen, Sometimes there is not even a sign.

It was actually a pleasure to be climbing and descending and we all enjoyed it. We were rewarded with sweeping vistas of farmland. and villages. Route signage was excellent and we followed the signs into the city all the way to the train station. The first section was ultra-modern office buildings: it seemed as if we were on another planet. We then looked down upon the old city as we crossed a towering bridge. We would not have time to explore as we were headed to the train station to catch a train to Leige, Belgium.

Some climbing in Luxumbourg, strange after so much flat riding.
Some climbing in Luxumbourg, strange after so much flat riding.
"I made it!"
“I made it!”
After so many days of riverside riding, the hilltop view seemed strange.
After so many days of riverside riding, the hilltop view seemed strange.
Luxumbourg.
Tom waits for me and Ginny at this more than Stelvio-steep but short hill.
Tom waits for me and Ginny at this more than Stelvio-steep but short hill.
Modern Luxumbourg.
Modern Luxumbourg.
Old Luxumbourg.
Old Luxumbourg.

At the impressive Leige station we took a much shorter train ride to Verviers, Belgium to stay with Pierre and David, former overnight bicycle guests of Tom and Ginny in Missoula. Pierre and Davis live in a large, old home that belongs to Pierre’s grandmother. His brother shares part of the residence. There is a huge garden out front and sheep grazing in the back yard. Pierre and David made salad from the garden and cooked us pasta, then gave us separate bedrooms. They would escort us to Netherlands in the morning.

The amazing Leige train station.
The amazing Leige train station.
Looking east out of the train station.
Looking east out of the train station.
Pierre and David's home in Verveirs, Belgium.
Pierre and David’s home in Verveirs, Belgium.
Some pretty cool digs for road weary cyclists.
Some pretty cool digs for road weary cyclists.
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